Hellgate Static

        

 

January 2007

W7PX

http://www.users.qwest.net/~k7vk/

Next meeting is January 8, 2007

At St. Patrick Hospital basement meeting room (1st level)

500 West Broadway      

1900

 

 

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Hellgate Amateur Radio Club

P.O. Box 3811

Missoula, MT. 59806-3811

HARC Board of Directors

Club President, N7GE, Jerry Ehli at jehli@modernmachinery.com
Vice-president, W7PAQ Frank Kisselbach at fkissel@hughes.com
Treasurer, K7PX, Steve Schlang at ripply1@msn.com

Secretary, KE7NO, Craig Nelson at twincreek@blackfoot.net

Program Director, AC7UZ, Lewis Ball at ac7uz@blackfoot.net 

Training, W7DHB, Dennis Barthel at w7dhb@montana.com

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HARC  Christmas Party December 9, 2006

Dinner Wrap-up

Nearly 30 Hellgate ARC members and their families attended the Christmas dinner, election and entertaining events at the Golden Corral Saturday Evening.

 

Elections headed up the after-dinner events keeping W7DHB Dennis and N7FMW Ruth (and occasionally AC7UZ Lewis) looking for ‘hanging chad’ to determine the outcome.  It was a close race and KE7NO Craig was railroaded as the ‘big winner’ Sorry Thanks Craig!

The Election Results:  President:  N7GE  Jerry;  Vice-president:  W7PAQ Frank; Secretary: KE7NO, Craig and Treasurer:  K7PX, Steve.

 

    Much workload was piled on the president’s plate (N7GE) awaiting his return as he’s basking in the sun on some lonely Hawaiian beach!  His xyl, KB7MOX Patty, is actually working hard at a conference.

Program Director:  AC7UZ, Lewis; Training: W7DHB Dennis.  Repeater Committee: (2 yr) NZ7S, Eric; NN8A, Byron and (1 yr) W7XY, Donnie; KE7NO, Craig.  The Vice-pres is always the committee chair. 

Thanks all for your willingness to take on these positions!

 

K7VK, Vick presented Certificates of Special Achievement to W7DHB Dennis, W7XY Donnie, AC7UZ Lewis & N7FMW Ruth for their assistance in the Hellgate ARC’s 200th examination session since 1984.  No-show Ves (~15) may receive their certificates at a later date, hee hee. 

 

Great Christmas gifts were exchanged as NN8A facilitated the ‘open, appropriate & trade’ session.  It was a blast!  Tools, test & radio gear and a unique “Jim Beam” bottle antenna topped the list. 

Thanks for attending and Happy Holidays to all! 

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Contents of Certificate w/ each VE’s Call and name embedded on their certificate.  HARC Ves:  K7VK, K7BA, N7TAE, K7PX, N7FMW, NZ7M, N7GE, WA7ZOO, W7DHB, K7YB, KF7TM, KE7WR, N7MSU, W7GJ, AC7UZ, WA7W, KJ7NL, W7XT, WV7Z, KJ7Z, KI7WR, W7XY.  SKs Ves : KV7T, K7MEA, KB7P.

(This was stolen from our webpage, thanks Vick!)


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MONTHLY MONTANA SECTION NEWS

November's been an interesting month for many amateurs.  We had the annual Sweepstakes contest that attracts many ops.  Always a good time.  Fred Cady, KE7X was out on Dxpedition and apparently did very well, lots of contacts.

The annual Skywarn contest, run from Weather Service offices here in Montana was a success.  Thanks to all who put up antennas and braved the cold to participate and also to the Weather Service personnel who made it all possible.

For those who might have missed the bulletins, the FCC "Report and Order" that sets new sub-bands for 75 and 40 meters will take effect at 1201 EST on 15 Dec.  Look for phone users down to 3600 khz (Extras), Advanced ops down to 3700 khz and Generals down to 3800 khz.  Our NTS net freqs have been taken for phone users, moving IMN down to 3578.5 khz, same time.

I hope everyone here in MT has a great Holiday Season and enjoys the company of family and friends.  Season's greetings from our bunch to yours.

IMN-W5UYH, QNI-490, QTC-96
MTN-KD7HWV, QNI-2345, QTC-33
MSN-K7YD, AE7V, K7LMT, K7MT-88

73 all

Doug, K7YD

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FCC “OMNIBUS” FREQUENCY DISPLAY

As a majority of us already know, the FCC has been very busy lately.  Good, bad, or indifferent, it is the “law of the land” or soon will be.  Here is a diagram to help us along for a while.

 

80 meters

class

 

CCCCC

 

 

 

N, T

 

XXXXX

 

 

AAAAA

G

 

XXXXX

 

AAAAA

AAAAA

A

XXX

XXXXX

AAAAA

AAAAA

AAAAA

E

                                         3.500     3.525        3.600        3.700     3.800       4.000                                                                     

40 meters

class

 

CCCCC

 

 

N, T

 

XXXXX

 

AAAAA

G

 

XXXXX

AAAAA

AAAAA

A

XXX

XXXXX

AAAAA

AAAAA

E

                                        7.000     7.025        7.125        7.175      7.300            

 

15 meters

class

 

CCCCC

 

 

 

N, T

 

XXXXX

 

 

AAAAAA

G

 

XXXXX

 

AAAA

AAAAAA

A

XXX

XXXXX

AAA

AAAA

AAAAAA

E

                                         21.000  21.025       21.200  21.225      21.275      21.450

 

10 meters

class

 

CCCC

BBB

 

N, T

XXX

XXXX

AAA

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

G, A, E

                                         28.000  28.025    28.300  28.500                           29.700

 

Frequencies are listed at the bottom of chart and are in Megahertz.  Classes are listed as N-Novice, T-Technician and Technician plus (after the formal acceptance of the Rules and Orders dockets please see following articles), A-Advanced, and E-Extra.  Transmission subbands are as follows: C-CW only, X-CW, RTTY, and other digital, A-CW, phone, and image, B-CW and SSB.

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FCC TO DROP MORSE TESTING FOR ALL AMATEUR LICENSE CLASSES

SB QST @ ARL $ARLB030

ARLB030 FCC to Drop Morse Testing for All Amateur License Classes

 

ZCZC AG30

QST de W1AW 

ARRL Bulletin 30  ARLB030

From ARRL Headquarters 

Newington CT  December 16, 2006

To all radio amateurs

 

In an historic move, the FCC has acted to drop the Morse code requirement for all Amateur Radio license classes. The Commission today adopted a Report and Order (R&O) in WT Docket 05-235. In a break from typical practice, the FCC only issued a public notice at or about the close of business and not the actual Report and Order, so some details -- including the effective date of the R&O – remain uncertain.  The public notice is located at,

http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-269012A1.pdf.

 

Also today, the FCC also adopted an Order on Reconsideration, in WT Docket 04-140 -- the "omnibus" proceeding -- agreeing to modify the Amateur Radio rules in response to an ARRL request to accommodate automatically controlled narrowband digital stations on 80 meters in the wake of rule changes that became effective today at 12:01 AM Eastern Time. The Commission said it will carve out the 3585 to 3600 kHz frequency segment for such operations. Prior to the long-awaited action on the Morse code issue, Amateur Radio applicants for General and higher class licenses had to pass a 5 WPM Morse code test to operate on HF. The Commission said today's R&O eliminates that requirement for General and Amateur Extra applicants.

 

"This change eliminates an unnecessary regulatory burden that may discourage current Amateur Radio operators from advancing their skills and participating more fully in the benefits of Amateur Radio," the FCC said. The ARRL had asked the FCC to retain the 5 WPM for Amateur Extra class applicants only. The FCC proposed earlier to drop the requirement across the board, however, and it held to that decision in today's R&O.

 

Perhaps more important, the FCC's action in WT Docket 05-235 appears to put all Technician licensees on an equal footing: Once the R&O goes into effect, holders of Technician class licenses will have equivalent HF privileges, whether or not they've passed the 5 WPM Element 1 Morse examination. The FCC said the R&O in the Morse code docket would eliminate a disparity in the operating privileges for the Technician and Technician Plus class licensees. Technician licensees without Element 1 credit (i.e., Tech Plus licensees) currently have operating privileges on all amateur frequencies above 30 MHz.

 

"With today's elimination of the Morse code exam requirements, the FCC concluded that the disparity between the operating privileges of Technician Class licensees and Technician Plus Class licensees should not be retained," the FCC said in its public notice. "Therefore, the FCC, in today's action, afforded Technician and Technician Plus licensees identical operating privileges."

 

The wholesale elimination of a Morse code requirement for all license classes ends a longstanding national and international regulatory tradition in the requirements to gain access to Amateur Radio frequencies below 30 MHz. The first no-code license in the US was the Technician ticket, instituted in 1991. The question of whether or not to drop the Morse requirement altogether has been the subject of often-heated debate over the past several years, but the handwriting has been on the wall. A number of countries, including Canada, no longer require applicants for an Amateur Radio license to pass a Morse code test to gain HF operating privileges. The list has been increasing regularly.

 

The FCC said today's R&O in WT Docket 05-235 comports with revisions to the international Radio Regulations resulting from the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) World Radiocommunication Conference 2003 (WRC-03). At that gathering, delegates agreed to authorize each country to determine whether or not to require that applicants demonstrate Morse code proficiency in order to qualify for an Amateur Radio license with privileges on frequencies below 30 MHz.

 

Typically, the effective date of an FCC Order is 30 days after it appears in the Federal Register. That would mean the Morse requirement and the revised 80-meter segment for automatically controlled digital stations would likely not go into effect until late January 2007.

 

The ARRL will provide any additional information on these important Part 97 rule revisions as it becomes available.

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HAMS MOURN DROPPING MORSE CODE REQUIREMENT

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 27 (UPI) -- Ham radio enthusiasts are miffed at a recent decision not to require proficiency in Morse code for amateur radio licenses in the United States.

 

The Federal Communications Commission decided last month that knowledge of the venerable dots and dashes was no longer a vital skill in a realm that has become more technologically advanced.  The International Herald Tribune said Wednesday that Morse code is rarely used for emergency communications any more.

 

But members of the amateur radio, or ham, community believe the FCC is "dumbing down" their field and Morse code could eventually wither and die.  Others told the Herald Tribune that Morse code would live on as an enjoyable skill and hobby and some predicted dropping the requirement could spark a new surge of interest in ham radio operation.  "It's a bit like a foreign language," Bay Area operator John Fore told the newspaper. "You learn it and it's fun to use it."

 

© Copyright 2006 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
United Press International, UPI, the UPI logo, and other trademarks and service marks, are registered or unregistered trademarks of United Press International, Inc. in the United States and in other countries.

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A SAD DAY FOR THE HARC

On December 12, 2006, four HARC members packed up the amateur radio gear and antennas removed them from the abandoned Red Cross office in Missoula.  The Red Cross is consolidating its offices nation-wide.  Western Montana will now be coordinated from the Kalispell officeDisassembling the Station were NN8A, Bryon; AC7UZ Lewis; K7VK Vick & W7DHB Dennis.

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From the ARRL CONTEST RATE SHEET

December 27, 2006

Edited by Ward Silver N0AX

The ANDE, RAFT and NMARS satellites were deployed from the Space Shuttle on 21 December. ANDE and RAFT also carry packet radio communications systems and join with other US Naval Academy APRS digipeating satellites such as PCSAT-1 and PCSAT2. More information on all three satellites is available at http://www.ew.usna.edu/~bruninga/ande-raft-ops.html (Reprinted from the AMSAT Weekly Bulletin ANS-358 - http://www.amsat.org)

Keith NM5G contributes a link (http://www.nyeviking.com) of interest to owners of Nye-Viking tuners.  The tuners were quite popular, but are no longer made. The site has "everything you need to know," says Keith.

 

Trying to remove a ground rod? Let Jim N2EY give you some tips. "The first step is to break the adhesion to the soil by turning the rod.  Get a large pipe wrench - not an adjustable wrench or gripping pliers, but a true pipe wrench. Use the pipe wrench to grab the ground rod in the classic 3-points-of-contact way. Turn the rod. If you need more leverage, put a breaker bar or length of pipe on the pipe wrench. A couple of turns will loosen most ground rods so well that you can yank them out with one hand. Jacks and chains and such should only be used after the turning process has been tried."

If you're looking for nearby broadcast stations, "Go to the FCC Web site http://www.fcc.gov/mb/audio/ and click on the link for AM query.  Plug in the lat/lon of your QTH near the bottom of the form, with a distance of 15 miles or so. You'll get all the licenses, with their powers, whether they have different day/night power and/or patterns, and distance from you. DA means directional antenna, DA-N means directional at night, DA2 means directional with different patterns day and night." (Thanks, Jim K9YC)

 

While watching the two ISS astronauts trying to get the solar panel to retract in a spacewalk, Tom K1KI realized it was just like tower work! Talk to the ground, shake the boom, check the orientation, talk to the other person on the tower, move it a little more, etc.  I guess they'd need some serious rope!

Many of us that have opened up a rotator learned many interesting things during that first surgery - about ball bearings, gears, center of gravity, and other similar topics. Randy WB4UNA provides three helpful hints for disassembling and reassembling Ham-II/III/IV and Tailtwister rotators.
- Before disassembling, turn the unit to the north or center position
- Make an alignment mark between the housings before separating them
- Hold the rotator upside down when disassembling to keep the ball bearings at home in the top housing.


TECHNICAL URL OF THE WEEK -- After the recent big solar flares - quite rare at the bottom of the solar cycle - there is renewed interest in sunspots. For those interested in some illustrations, Paul NA5N has put together a very nice one-page guide to solar phenomena.  It's available from the G-QRP Web site (http://www.gqrp.com) under the SPRAT button as "Handiman's Guide to Solar Activity" in the Datasheets list.  There's quite a lot of good information on that site, as well.

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THE TESTING DATE FOR JANUARY 2007

Given all the news from above, how can you not want to go test and move to an upper class license?  Well, as always, the Hellgate ARC is there for you! 

The Date-  Tuesday January 16, 2007

The Time- 6:00 PM local

The Place- Missoula Public Library, 301 East Main Street

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DUES ARE DUE

2007 Dues will be due.  Please support the repeater system and club activities.  Annual membership is $25.00 ($5.00 for additional family members).  Dues are payable to the Hellgate ARC treasurer, K7PX, Steve at ripply1@msn.com.  New members may fill out the application membership (available on the website) and send it to us.

 

 

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CAN YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR?

(Heterodyned from the defenseless carol “Do You Hear What I Hear”)

(By Dr. Beldar ,within the December 27, 2006 Contest Rate Sheet)

Said the Big Gun to his fellow ham
Can you see what I see
Rising in the sky, fellow ham?
Can you see what I see?
The moon, the moon
Moving through the night
A target that tracks left to right
A target that tracks left to right

Said his fellow ham to the student boy
Can you hear what I hear
Bouncing off the moon, student boy?
Can you hear what I hear?
An "O", an "O"
That traveled EME
The path loss is many dB
The path loss is many dB

Said the student boy to K1JT
We'll use DSP code
With a sound card on a PC
But our dish is so old
The feed, the feed
It just might corrode
Let us plate it silver and gold
Let us plate it silver and gold

Said JT to the stations everywhere
You can hear what I send
Process signals with my new software
You can hear what I send
The moon, the moon
Shining in the night
You can all give moonbounce a try
You can all give moonbounce a try

The moon, the moon
Shining in the night
You can all give moonbounce a try

73, Ward N0AX

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HAPPY NEW YEAR AND A QUESTION TO YOU

We hope the HELLGATE STATIC was interesting for you this month.  Let us know if this newsletter is to your acceptance.  So far, I’ve only heard good things.  If there is something YOU would like to see, or that you feel is overdone, please let me know.  This is the Hellgate Amateur Radio Club newsletter, not mine!  If you have something (even a simple one-liner) please write to me at our address or e-mail me (Craig, KE7NO) at twincreek@blackfoot.net.